Real-time Earth and Moon phase

Monday, January 19, 2015

Big wave hits lighthouse


The above picture is from last Thursday's South China Morning Post with the headline
"Typhoon Neoguri threatens cities on Japan's central islands"
but this AP picture has an caption as "A big wave hits a lighthouse off Jeju in South Korea."  Whatever it is, this is a fascinate picture of a large wave engulfing the lighthouse -- not an everyday happening thing! Here's some from the article:

A strong typhoon swerved towards Japan's heavily populated central islands yesterday after it slammed through Okinawa, dumping heavy rain, knocking out power and injuring at least 30 people.
Typhoon Neoguri left toppled trees, flooded cars and bent railings on the island chain, which experienced its heaviest rainfall in a half century, according to the Okinawa government.

I did not even paying attention to the typhoon yet. Aside from the news part I found this from the article of interest:
Neoguri, which means "raccoon dog" in Korean, was moving northwards at 15km/h packing sustained winds of 108km/h by evening, the Japan Meteorological Agency said.
Hmm, raccoon dog, I wonder what do they translate the term in Chinese?

Monday, January 05, 2015

Cargo ship Cemfjord in Pentland Firth

This following picture is from the Press and Journal of UK reporting the case near Scotland coast with the headline: "Capsized cargo ship could have been hit by a ‘rogue wave’"


Here's what had happened:

Rescue efforts to find the eight-strong crew of a huge cargo ship lost off the north coast of Scotland were stood down last night with no sign of survivors. 
The Cemfjord sank in the Pentland Firth, just hours after its upturned hull was spotted in the water by a passing ferry.
One theory is that the boat, which was carrying thousands of tonnes of cement, may have been hit by a “rogue wave” as the area was battered by high winds. 
Rescuers spoke of difficult weather conditions in the Pentland Firth on Friday when the Cemfjord was last seen.
Very depressing to hear that there's no survivors yet. And here's some more:

Mystery surrounds the final moments of the vessel, which did not issue a mayday when it got into difficulty. 
The last recording by marine tracking devices was at 1.15pm on Friday when it was detected between the islands of Stroma and Swona, drifting at 5.2 knots, roughly 6 mph.
The Cypriot-registered cargo vessel left Aalborg in Denmark on December 30 and was heading for Runcorn, Cheshire, with a cargo of 2,000 tonnes of cement.
 
It was due to arrive at its destination on January 5, however, the upturned hull was spotted 11 miles off the Pentland Skerries on Saturday afternoon by the NorthLink ferry, MV Hrossey, which was heading to Aberdeen from Shetland with 241 passengers on board. 
A search was launched but failed to find any trace of the eight crew, including seven Polish members and one Filipino.
Finally this:

Wick Lifeboat coxswain Ian Cormack said: “We have exhausted all the possibilities and we are running out of places to look. 
“We searched from Wick up to Duncansby Head, all around the Pentland Skerries and then on South Ronaldsay to Grim Ness, but there’s just nothing.” 
Mr Cormack said it was unusual that the Cemfjord’s emergency positioning indicating radio beacon had not activated. The device is meant to transmit the vessel’s position to emergency services. 
He added: “It all points to a sudden catastrophic event. All I can think is that they were hit by a rogue wave.” 
He said there had been 60-70mph gusts in the firth on Friday, and that in windy conditions standing waves could be created by ebb tides in a phenomenon known as the Merry Men of Mey. 
Mr Cormack said: “It’s all supposition but they could have been hit by a freak wave which turned them. 
“It must have been massive.”
So


Remembering a huge 'rogue' wave

This very intriguing news item is from the Eureka Times-Standard with an equally intriguing headline: "Remembering a huge 'rogue' wave"!
that was posted yesterday. This headline is actually the title of an event commemorating an event happened 100 years ago:
The Trinidad Head Lighthouse is shown here perched high up on Trinidad Head. In late 1914 and early 1915, Lighthouse Keeper Fred L. Harrington witnessed a massive wave that washed over Pilot Rock to the south and crashed into Trinidad Head, jarring the lens out of alignment. The Bureau of Land Management is partnering with the city of Trinidad, Trinidad Rancheria, Cher-Ae Heights Casino and the Trinidad Museum Society to host an event at the lighthouse on Jan. 10 from 2-5 p.m. to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the wave. The event is free of charge, and a shuttle will run hourly from the Seascape Restaurant to the lighthouse. For more information, call the BLM’s Arcata Field Office at 707-825-2313. Photo courtesy of the Bureau of Land Management
The article was written by Caly McGlaughlin.



This light house is one located in a spectacular location but not itself a spectacular building as one might expect. As McGlaughlin tells:
But 100 years ago, another type of weather extreme was battering the North Coast, as a “massive storm blew gale-force winds over this area for about two weeks” in 1914-15, according to Bureau of Land Management Interpretive Specialist Leisyka Parrott. Based on reports from the time, the storm caused a “200-foot wave that shook the Trinidad Head Lighthouse,” disturbing the lens and making life difficult for lighthouse keeper Fred L. Harrington and his wife, Josephine.
So they are going to have this special event to remembering this event! Since the main witnesses of this event are the lighthouse keeper and his wife, they no longer around, there was a newspaper interview as :
Firsthand account
According to an interview with Harrington published in a newspaper shortly after the event, “The storm commenced on Dec. 28, 1914, blowing a gale that night. The gale continued for a whole week and was accompanied by a very heavy sea from the southwest. On the 30th and 31st, the sea increased and at 3 p.m. on the 31st seemed to have reached its height, when it washed a number of times over (93-foot-high) Pilot Rock, a half mile south of the head.
“At 4:40 p.m., I was in the tower and had just set the lens in operation and turned to wipe the lantern room windows when I observed a sea of unusual height, then about 200 yards distant, approaching. I watched it as it came in. When it struck the bluff, the jar was very heavy, and the sea shot up to the face of the bluff and over it, until the solid sea seemed to me to be on a level with where I stood in the lantern,” Harrington said.
“Then it commenced to recede and the spray went 25 feet or more higher. The sea itself fell over onto the top of the bluff and struck the tower on about a level with the balcony, making a terrible jar. The whole point between the tower and the bluff was buried in water. The lens immediately stopped revolving and the tower was shivering from the impact for several seconds. Whether the lens was thrown off level by the jar on the bluff, or the sea striking the tower, I could not say. Either one would have been enough. However, I had it leveled and running in half an hour.
“About an hour later another sea threw spray up on the level of the bluff, and the constant jars of the heavy sea was much over normal during the night and the whole of the next day. On the 3rd, the sea moderated to some extent, but a strong southeast wind and high sea continued until the 5th. During the 26 years that I have been stationed here, there has at no time been a sea of any such size as that of the 31st experienced here: but once during that time have I known the spray to come onto the bluff in front of the tower, and but twice have I seen sea or spray go over Pilot Rock,” said Harrington.





What an event! Too bad I can't make it to Trinidad now, I would love to hear about all the remembrances!


Thursday, December 04, 2014

Wishing for tranquility!

This is a picture I saw many times on the sky while I was in my backyard. But I have not been able to successfully capture it with my aim and shoot camera.  I happen to noticed this picture on the internet, I would like to preserve it here. My admiration and salute to the photographer who took this picture!




November2014 has been a quiet period in the ocean freaque wave front. Let hope and pray that freaque waves in the ocean and lakes can remain dormant always or occurs only when there is no people around to encounter them.  May your/our life be always be ia a state of tranquility, never be bothered by unexpectedness or freaque waves!

Saturday, November 01, 2014

Lake Michigan waves near Milwaukee on Halloween evening

It is not very often to find news about waves on the Great Lakes, this one here about wave at Lake Michigan near Milwaukee is of interest. It's not about freaque waves but freaque waves were mentioned:
Waves crash, leaves swirl on windy Wisconsin HalloweenBy Julia Fello and Shannon Sims. CREATED Oct 31, 2014 - UPDATED: Oct 31, 2014MILWAUKEE - It looked more like the Atlantic Ocean than Lake Michigan.Tall waves crashed into the fishing pier at McKinley Marina Friday."We know when the wind is high the waves are coming, we try to get down here take pictures...enjoy it," says Pamela Griffin.Dozens flocked to the lakefront to see the spectacular display. A sight that took all by surprise on Halloween night.The waves so high - they washed out a section of the parking lot."We both sail and we have never seen waves like this." says Ian Weismann.Northerly winds at up to 50 miles an hour churned the waters of Lake Michigan from Port Washington to Milwaukee.Mia Ortlieb warns onlookers - "You can't get too close because a rogue wave is going to come up."
Well it is more about weather, storm, waves things more than freaque waves happening. I guess during storming condition there's no surprises, big waves are expected hence freaque wave in the usual sense is not present. Check out the article's accompanied video, I don't know how long they'll keep it up. While it lasts, there are some good wave scenes in western Lake Michigan near Milwaukee!

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Massive waves at Pulpit Rock, Isle of Portland

UK DailyMail yesterday published the article online with the following introductions:

Water idiot! Photographer captures moment man diced with death by climbing onto rocky outpost cut off by huge waves

  • The man scaled the 50ft ancient rock stack - Pulpit Rock - on the Isle of Portland in Weymouth, Dorset, yesterday
  • He stood there for 10 minutes while massive storms battered the coastline, causing violent waves to lash the rocks
  • Local photographer Sean Hepburn captured the moment while he was documenting pictures of the severe storm
  • He branded the man a 'lunatic' for the stunt and says he was 'incredibly lucky' and could have been 'a goner'
  • Prompted coastguards to issue a warning advising people to stay away from cliff edges especially when wet
The article included some breath taking photos along with a super video well worth a visit. on: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2787832/water-idiot-photographer-captures-moment-man-diced-death-climbing-rocky-outpost-cut-huge-waves.html#ixzz3FqX4Hs3x

I guess it's not easy to define those waves as "freaque" since they are expected rather than unexpected. Anyway for mortals like me I am very happy to watch it in my comfortable home on my computer screen and admiring that brave soul challenge those waves and nature. My hat's off for the photographer that recorded the whole thing.  Let's just be happy and thank God for that lucky "lunatic" for not made him a "goner"!

Monday, September 22, 2014

A freaque wave encounter off Kauai, Hawaii

Now a real life freaque wave encounter case on a leisurely fishing trip off Niihau, Kauai, Hawaii. The news and video can be found here:
          http://www.kitv.com/news/a-fishing-boat-in-kauai-capsizes/28117774#ixzz3E3v0gybB,
and here's part of the transcript:
One man is sharing his painful fishing tale ... KITV4's Lara Yamada has the story ... of one, lucky, fisherman.  
 . . . A LEISURLY HAWAII FISHING TRIP GONE TERRIBLY WRONG. BRAD WARREN IS RECOVERING AT WILCOX HOSPITAL ON KAUAI. AFTER A ROUGE WAVE CAPSIZED THE BOAT HE AND TWO OTHERS WERE ABOARD SUNDAY NIGHT OFF NIIHAU. A POWERFUL WAVE SENDING WARREN FLYING, SHATTERING HIS LEG IN 3 PLACES, BREAKING HIS HIP, THEN SUBMURGING HIM UNDER WATER. 
"I tilted my head back to get another last gulp of air and a swell pushed the vote I took a big gulp of water and started going down it was scary." 
 THE CAPTAIN OF THE BOAT AND HIS 10 YEAR OLD SON WERE SLEEPING IN THE BOW OF THE VESSEL AS THE BOAT QUICKLY BEGAN FILLING WITH WATER.  
"My first thought was to grab Noah, you know make sure I had a hold of him." 
 THE MEN CLAMMORING TO THE TOP OF THE VESSEL BUT THE RELENTLESS WAVES CONTINUALLY KNOCKING HIM OFF THE BOAT AND BACK INTO THE OCEAN. AFTER 4 HOURS WITH NO HOPE IN SIGHT, 10 YEAR OLD NOAH HEARD SOMETHING IN THE DISTANCE: A PARTY ON SHORE PLAYING AN INSPIRATIONAL 1981 HIT:  
"I saw that shooting star and I heard the Journey song "don't stop believing" that was the lord saying you will be fine." 
THE PAIN GROWING TOO TOUGH TO BARE, THE THREE HELD ON TO EACH OTHER. 
"He was convinced the pain was so bad, he just wanted to swim in."  
WARREN WITH NO USE OF HIS RIGHT SIDE, SWIMMING FROM THE BOAT FOR 1/2 AN HOUR TO DRY LAND.  
"We just felt so relieved. " 
WARREN NOW SO GREATFUL FOR THE LIFE HE THOUGHT HE ALMOST LOST.: 
"I wanted to make sure I made it for my wife and my daughters."  Reported  Lara Yamada KITV4 News. 
The Garden Island Newspaper reports - Romanak went back to "Kikiaoloa Small Boar Harbor" in Kekaha last night... and found his boat had WASHED ASHORE! He says he's glad everyone's OK -- and is considering getting a BIGGER, SAFER boat. 
An incredible story, but it is really a happy ending story good for all to hear that everyone is fine after their terrible ordeal.  Thanks be to God!

Saturday, September 20, 2014

'Near Miss' on Hibernia as Rogue Wave Strikes Workers

Here's a news item on www.vocm.com with the title "'Near Miss' on Hibernia as Rogue Wave Strikes Workers" published on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014:
 
It was a close call for some Hibernia workers last weekend in what the company calls 'a high potential near miss'.

Four people were working on the gravity-based structure roof slab Sunday when two waves came over the top and struck them.
 
 Two of the employees lost their footing and fell with one sustaining minor cuts to a hand. The  Hibernia Management and Development Company says workers were wearing immersion suits at  the time of the incident.

So "Two waves came over the top and struck them." clearly indicates this is indeed an encounter of freaque waves  in the North Atlantic Ocean.